You are here Graduatte College Science Graduate Schools SFMBBMObjectives

Tools

Coming soon...

No event

Job opportunities

No job opportunity

Administration

Objectives - SFMBBM


The graduate school SMFBBM was created in order to:


  • Promote the doctoral training in closely interconnected scientific fields such as biochemistry of macromolecules, structural biology, proteomics, bioinformatics and modelling.
  • Promote contacts between PhD students during their doctoral training.
  • Provide scientific background and knowledge as well as human resources to help the PhD student at the beginning of his scientific career.
  • Allow access to expensive or state of the art techniques distributed across the country: NMR, X-ray diffraction, high-end spectroscopy (e.g. FTIR), informatic resources and algorithms, proteomic techniques (mass spectrometry, separation techniques, automated peptide synthesis and analysis, sequencing techniques, etc.)
  • Enable national and international interactions during scientific meetings (e.g. seminars, meetings, summer schools, training courses, etc.)
  • Prepare PhD students to professional life (academic or industrial) by providing interpersonal skills and by building their self-confidence through oral presentations and international exchanges, to develop their capacity to communicate in English through the redaction of scientific publications, international projects and personal reports.


The graduate school covers a large spectrum of interconnected fields:


  • Structure determination and functional studies of peptides and proteins.
  • Synthesis, chemistry, purification and characterization of proteins and peptides.
  • Study of post-translational modifications of proteins.
  • Proteomics
  • Genomic, proteomic and structural bioinformatics studies.
  • Biochemical purification and characterization of polysaccharides and nucleic acids.
  • Interactions between macromolecules (proteins/proteins, proteins/nucleic acids, proteins/ligands)
  • Biological systems modeling
  • In silico approaches, chemical genomics, chemical proteomics, drug design.

 

Last update by EDT SFMBBM on Tuesday 25 January 2011